No swimming but athletes still get wet at Ironman Maryland

Dorchester Banner/Paul Clipper Water Street flooded when the tide came in Saturday afternoon.

Dorchester Banner/Paul Clipper
Water Street flooded when the tide came in Saturday afternoon.

CAMBRIDGE — Great Marsh Park was buzzing before dawn Saturday, Oct. 1, as competitors and spectators filed into the partly flooded park before the beginning of Ironman Maryland.

There was an international presence as many people spoke excitedly in French, German and Spanish as they waited for the race to begin. According to a news release from Ironman, nearly 2,000 athletes representing 35 countries and 49 states started the 2016 Ironman Maryland triathlon. Competitors ranged in age from 19 to 88.

The excited tone turned to grumbling just after dawn when the swim was cancelled because of unsafe conditions following a 30-minute delay. The Choptank River lived up to its name with high winds producing choppy waves.

Some of the competitors left the event when the swim was cancelled. A number of people grumbled that they should have chosen the Oct. 2 Ironman in Cozumel, Mexico, instead of coming to Cambridge.

With the beginning of the bike race, a festive atmosphere returned as spectators lined Somerset Avenue, encouraging and cheering for the competitors. Because of coastal flooding from persistent rain and high tides, both the bike route and running route were modified. Although they didn’t swim, competitors did get wet as Water Street, part of the running track, flooded in the afternoon when the tide came in.

Dorchester Banner/Courtesy of Ironman Chris Nocera of Stamford, Conn., crosses the finish line and was the overall male winner.

Dorchester Banner/Courtesy of Ironman
Chris Nocera of Stamford, Conn., crosses the finish line and was the overall male winner.

Dorchester Banner/Paul Clipper Lisa Goetz of Toronto, Canada, was the top finisher among female competitors.

Dorchester Banner/Paul Clipper
Lisa Goetz of Toronto, Canada, was the top finisher among female competitors.

Chris Nocera of Stamford, Conn., and Lisa Goetz from Toronto, Ontario, finished first in the male and female groups with finish times of 6:59:24 and 08:14:27, respectively. John Kelly, of Rockville, finished in second among the men. The event offered 40 age-group qualifying slots to the 2017 Ironman World Championship, Oct. 14 in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii.

You are encouraged to leave relevant comments but engaging in personal attacks, threats, online bullying or commercial spam will not be allowed. All comments should remain within the bounds of fair play and civility. (You can disagree with others courteously, without being disagreeable.) Feel free to express yourself but keep an open mind toward finding value in what others say. To report abuse or spam, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box.