Descendants of a ‘Keeper’ visit here

submitted to dorchester banner/Cambridge Lighthouse Foundation) Front row, from left: Brenda Creswell, Lynn Sisk, Lewis Creswell, Joy Brown and Caroline Earls. Back row: Katie Ziadie, Jamie Earls, Keri Beth Howard, and Molly Howard.

submitted to dorchester banner/Cambridge Lighthouse Foundation)
Front row, from left: Brenda Creswell, Lynn Sisk, Lewis Creswell, Joy Brown and Caroline Earls. Back row: Katie Ziadie, Jamie Earls, Keri Beth Howard, and Molly Howard.

CAMBRIDGE — On Oct. 7, the descendants of a man named William Quimby Price came to Cambridge from the Carolinas and Baltimore to visit the Choptank River Lighthouse. Colonel Price, a Union Army veteran of the Civil War, served as the live-aboard keeper of the lighthouse between 1874 and 1881.

The Lighthouse Mr. Price served on was the first of two screwpile-style lighthouses that guided mariners along the Choptank River. In the years of his service, it was located out in the middle of the Choptank River, near the mouth of the Tred Avon River. The lighthouse that stands today at Long Wharf is a replica of the second such structure, which stood out in the river between 1919 and 1964.

Mr. Price’s great-great-great-granddaughter, Katie Ziadie, got in touch with the non–profit Cambridge Lighthouse Foundation several months ago to arrange the visit. Her sister, Jamie Earls, had recently begun delving into the family’s history and discovered the lighthouse connection.

“This is so special for us,” Ms. Ziadie said during the recent visit. “We have been looking forward to coming to see this ever since Jamie started making her discoveries.”

The family’s oral history points to an interesting incident on the lighthouse, as family members have been told for generations now that the birth of Mr. Price’s daughter, Hattie Diggs Price Wiseman, happened on a lighthouse. As she was born in 1878, that birth almost certainly would happened here at the Choptank River Lighthouse.

Most of the family members who visited hail from South Carolina. A couple of Baltimore-based members of the family came down to join the visit as well.

Cambridge Lighthouse Foundation Director Jim Duffy and volunteer Dianne Baur met with the group and helped guide the visit. The Foundation gave a gift to the family of a canvas print of a photo of the Lighthouse by local photographer Jill Jasuta.

“That was such a fun and memorable visit,” Mr. Duffy said. “It was just a great experience, meeting these wonderful folks whose roots run right through our lighthouse.”

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