Pictured are the officers of the 1931 Cambridge police force assembled in front of the Cambridge Municipal Building on Gay Street. From left are: Charles E. Barnes, Assistant Chief Ware H. Hurley, Charles L. Shorter, Chief Daniel E. Brannock (1917-1936), Bradford A. Vickers and Roy E. Brohawn. In 1936 Grayson Price became chief. Photo courtesy of Sgt. Douglas McConnell. Posted on Cambridge Maryland Memories facebook by Debby Cook Fitzgerald.

Pictured are the officers of the 1931 Cambridge police force assembled in front of the Cambridge Municipal Building on Gay Street. From left are: Charles E. Barnes, Assistant Chief Ware H. Hurley, Charles L. Shorter, Chief Daniel E. Brannock (1917-1936), Bradford A. Vickers and Roy E. Brohawn. In 1936 Grayson Price became chief. Photo courtesy of Sgt. Douglas McConnell. Posted on Cambridge Maryland Memories facebook by Debby Cook Fitzgerald.

From the pages of The Banner

50 years ago
The most expensive construction project ever undertaken by the town of Hurlock is nearing completion. It is the $1.25 million sewer system that will serve the town plus four of its major industries.
After months of digging, clearing land and installing pipe, the project is about three weeks away from being finished.
Miles and miles of large pipe have been placed underground, laid through woodlands and open fields and under roads. Four large lagoons join south of Hurlock.
The lagoons resemble large ponds. It is predicted that when they are filled with water, they will attract ducks and geese.
Hurlock got a big jump on the State Health Department when the administration of Mayor William V. Smith started to work on the sewer system. Mayor Smith saw the handwriting on the wall.
He knew that the Health Department was going to clamp down on the industries in Hurlock and force them to do something about their waste material. The plants are primarily food processors.
So the mayor conceived the idea of calling four of the largest processors. He presented a plan that would be effective, yet would be less expensive and more efficient than individual sewerage systems.
The four plants that are participating in the sewer-lagoon project are: Harper & Bateman Pickle Co., the Hurlock Pickling Co., Acme Stores Cannery and the John N. Wright Jr. Inc. canning company.
100 years ago
It is the patriotic duty of every true American man and woman to celebrate the Fourth of July tomorrow. It has been nearly a hundred and fifty years since our ancestors, at a cost that could only have been justified through the securing of freedom, with the aid of France, wrung from mother country the right of self-government, and during the past century there has grown up, to a certain extent, a feeling of indifference; a lack of appreciation of the action of the men who gave their all in order to achieve for themselves and generations then unborn the right of independence.
Many people had come to feel that it was a holiday to be tolerated because some people wanted to go out and enjoy themselves, but in which they themselves had no real individual, personal part; it was all well enough for those who had nothing else to do, who liked the hurrah and excitement in connection with the music, the fireworks, etc.
How many men and women in Cambridge have felt that way about it, and how many have taken no part in a Fourth of July celebration for years? (Have you felt that way, dear reader?)
But how different this year; every patriotic man and woman is just anxious to do something.

Dave Ryan is editor of the Dorchester Banner. He can be reached at dryan@newszap.com.

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