Remembering Dorchester, Jan. 9, 2019

The biggest day in the history of the Holland Island schoolhouse must certainly have been around 120 years ago when Gov. Lloyd Lowndes Jr. and Comptroller Phillips Lee Goldsborough (1898) visited while on a tour of Eastern Shore public schools. (Photo above is of the last house on Holland Island.) They addressed the students about the necessity and benefits of education. According to a Baltimore Sun story published around Oct. 20, the oldest inhabitant remarked that although the island had been settled for nearly a century, it was the first time a governor had “done them the honor of stepping foot upon their soil.” When they departed that October afternoon the entourage headed to Crisfield. When the island was abandoned about a century ago several families settled in Somerset County, bringing houses with them including some still standing in Crisfield. To see more, the Dorchester County Historical Society has opened an exhibit of Holland Island artifacts, photos and family memorabilia at its Heritage Museums & Gardens of Dorchester, 1003 Greenway Drive in Cambridge. Museum hours are Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturdays 10-2 with admission $5. For more details call 410-228-7953.

The biggest day in the history of the Holland Island schoolhouse must certainly have been around 120 years ago when Gov. Lloyd Lowndes Jr. and Comptroller Phillips Lee Goldsborough (1898) visited while on a tour of Eastern Shore public schools. (Photo above is of the last house on Holland Island.) They addressed the students about the necessity and benefits of education. According to a Baltimore Sun story published around Oct. 20, the oldest inhabitant remarked that although the island had been settled for nearly a century, it was the first time a governor had “done them the honor of stepping foot upon their soil.” When they departed that October afternoon the entourage headed to Crisfield. When the island was abandoned about a century ago several families settled in Somerset County, bringing houses with them including some still standing in Crisfield. To see more, the Dorchester County Historical Society has opened an exhibit of Holland Island artifacts, photos and family memorabilia at its Heritage Museums & Gardens of Dorchester, 1003 Greenway Drive in Cambridge. Museum hours are Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturdays 10-2 with admission $5. For more details call 410-228-7953.

50 years ago
Plans for a new Cambridge Public Library building were discussed last night at a meeting of the library directors. Arthur Kamens, president of the directors, asked for a report from F. Hamilton Whipple who is serving as chairman of a New Building Committee.
Mr. Whipple told the board he and his committee have visited several new libraries in the state and hope to inspect several more before submitting any recommendations to the board.
Recently the City Council agreed to let the library place its new building on the Wallace property which adjoins the present library.
No action can be taken, however, until the Dorchester County Health Department vacates the Wallace house for a new health services building which is expected to be constructed at Woods Road and Route 50. Part of the proceeds from the county’s last $750,000 bond issue is to go for the new health department building.
Mr. Kamens said the present library has reached its book storage capacity of around 30,000 volumes. It is expected that the new library will accommodate twice that number.
Mrs. Jeanette Robbins, librarian at the Cambridge branch, reported last night that nearly 22,000 books, films and records were circulated during the final quarter of 1968 by the three branch libraries and the bookmobile. Branches are at Cambridge, Hurlock and Vienna. Each unit reported an increase in circulation over the same period in 1967.
Mrs. Robbins also stated that 827 new books have been added to the county library system since October, 1968.
100 years ago
The “Flue” is raging at Hoopers Island, both on the Middle and Upper Islands; there are about 300 cases on the two islands, and about 20 cases of pneumonia have developed. There is hardly a home where there is no sickness.
In some cases, every member of a family is in bed, and there are not enough people going about to wait on the sick ones. Dr. James W. Meade is the only doctor on the island, and he is doing more than any one man at all; people are just begging him to visit their families.
He is now being assisted by Cambridge doctors, but the charges are high when a doctor is called from Cambridge, and only a few can have them. If we could get a doctor or two to come here and stay for a week and help Dr. Meade, it would save many a life. Are there not some nurses willing to help?
Red Cross workers, show your colors. The people of Cambridge have sent several cans of milk, and different things, to help the sick ones; several times today businessmen of Cambridge have inquired of conditions here.
There are no nurses here to be had. No one is suffering for want of money or things that money can buy, but they are suffering for medical attention and for someone to nurse them. One doctor cannot treat this many patients.
Send us help, and send it quick!

Dave Ryan is editor of the Dorchester Banner. He can be reached at dryan@newszap.com.

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