A New Year for the arts at DCA

In the Galleries:

The W. Robert Tolley Memorial Members Show, through Jan. 28. For 2018, this annual show is named for the late Bob Tolley, one of the original founders of the Dorchester Center for the Arts. Bob passed away in 2017, but left a legacy that will continue for generations to come. Through his efforts and those of Shirley Brannock and John Bannon – all graduates of the Maryland Institute of Art, educators and practicing painters – DCA was founded in 1970 and continues to serve as a cultural arts center as well as the Maryland state-designated Arts Council for Dorchester. The show will include a special exhibit of Bob’s work.

The Artists’ Reception and Awards Ceremony will be held on Second Saturday, Jan. 13 from 5-7:30 p.m. with music and light refreshments – all are welcome. DCA Members are invited to a champagne meet and greet at 4 p.m., prior to the reception.

In the Classrooms:

This just might be the best year yet for trying something new in the arts. A variety of first-time classes are being offered including acrylic painting, principals of ceramics, quilting, and drawing. Returning instructional arts favorites include oil painting with Tom Ryan, Intermediate Watercolors with Barbara Zuehlke, Decoy Carving with Warren Saunders, Knitting with Windy Karpavage, Yarn Dying with Elissa Crouch, Stained Glass with Jan Boettger, Classical Italian Voice with Bonnie Forgacs, and Classical Guitar with Victoria Tarbutton.

New Lecture Series:

Perspectives on Artists and Their Worlds
DCA is pleased to welcome Gloria Rojas, with audio/visual support by Art Renkwitz, for a series of talks presenting history, contrasts, and techniques of great painters. Extensive use of visuals will be used to immerse the listener into the discussion. Participants need not have any background in art history, just an interest in visiting old friends or making new ones. Come for all, or pick and choose the weeks that most interest you. All ages are welcome. The lectures will be held from 6-8 p.m. Admission is free, light snacks provided. Call DCA to reserve your spot: 410-228-7782.

• Jan. 16 – John Singer Sargent and Andrew Wyeth: A Contrast
A quick glance at the works of these two great painters and you see immediately how different their paintings are. We examine their backgrounds and experiences to trace the developments that led to their unique styles.

• Jan. 23 – The Art of Everyday Life
We will map out a day in the life of EveryMan or Woman through the visions of great artists. From dawn to nightfall, our everyday lives are reflected in great art, no matter where you live or how old you are.

• Jan. 30 – Murals: From the Walls in Caves to the Streets of Dorchester
The historic cave drawings are beautiful and worth visiting, even if only by images on screen or in books. So are the Renaissance era murals. But the murals of the Chesapeake in Cambridge, East New Market, and Vienna hold their own importance to residents and visitors alike. Featuring muralist Michael Rosato as a special guest.

Gloria Rojas is a retired teacher and broadcast journalist. Her interest in painting dates back to childhood and her art studies have always been independent.

Art Renkwitz is a retired Cambridge High School Teacher of Science and Ethics. He currently is the founder and leader of “Socrates,” a weekly discussion group of philosophy.

Programs at DCA are supported by the Maryland State Arts Council, now celebrating 50 years of service to the arts. For complete schedule of activities and offerings, visit DCA online at www.dorchesterarts.org. Like us on Facebook!

DCA is located at 321 High St. in Historic downtown Cambridge. Open Tuesday – Thursday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., and Sunday 1 – 5 p.m.

Editor’s note: Spectrum is the weekly column of the Dorchester Arts Center. It is written by Barbara J. Seese, executive director.

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