Damp day doesn’t dim spirits at the Indie Craft Fair

Dorchester Banner/Gloria Rojas Terri Palamaras offered fall fair from Emily’s Produce at the Indie Craft Art Bazaar on the Richardson Maritime Museum’s lawn.

Dorchester Banner/Gloria Rojas
Terri Palamaras offered fall fair from Emily’s Produce at the Indie Craft Art Bazaar on the Richardson Maritime Museum’s lawn.

CAMBRIDGE — It wasn’t the crisp October Saturday you might have anticipated. Instead, the vendors at the Indie Craft Art Bazaar unpacked their tents on the wet grass of the Richardson Museum’s Boatworks lawn at Maryland Avenue. They opened shop under a steady downpour. The upside was that many visitors braved the rain to wander among the tents, to admire and buy the unusual crafts that were on display.

Artisan Amy Marlett sells seashells on the Eastern Shore, decorating crab shells with flags, anchors, and pretty views. The oyster shells however, become the jolly faces of Santa Claus and Mrs. Claus, waiting for Christmas. Amy would have liked more people to show up but she was not complaining about the rain. “At least it’s not cold, and it’s not windy,” she explained as rain drops pelted the top of her tent.

Artistic talent and imagination were apparent in both the creations and the business names on display. Kelly Alteri of Preston drew attention with a catchy name, “Glass Tidings.” She was doing a little business with her sea glass items, which she says come ready-tumbled from local rivers. Kelly said, “I am pleasantly surprised by the support for local artists.”

Still another catchy name was at the tent selling decorated canoe oars, “The Best Little Oarhouse.” A few tents away, watercolorist Rachel Alvarez was in her element in the non-stop rain. She paints the shape of a state and incorporates a feature of that state. The result produces unique posters and notecards.

The heavy rain soaked the shoppers but did not dampen the spirits. A laughing pair of young women staffed the booth of the Academy Art Museum in Easton. Damika Baker and Tracey Mullery of Cambridge offered art activities for children and program information for adults. Nearby, Terri Palamaras presided over the Emily’s Produce truck and defied the gray of the day with bright-colored pumpkins, squashes, and loads of flowers. And donuts. ‘Nuff said.

Preparations for the Indie Bazaar began almost two years ago, according to the organizers Gillian Draper and Colleen Brighton. They have regular jobs and do this as a hobby. The goal is to raise funds for the Richardson Museum by selling space to vendors. A raffle also brings in some funds. Gillian and Colleen explained that to attract the artisans and artists, they rely on Facebook and direct contact. Weather, however, is never reliable.

You are encouraged to leave relevant comments but engaging in personal attacks, threats, online bullying or commercial spam will not be allowed. All comments should remain within the bounds of fair play and civility. (You can disagree with others courteously, without being disagreeable.) Feel free to express yourself but keep an open mind toward finding value in what others say. To report abuse or spam, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box.