Sept. 6 declared Dist. 6 Champions’ Day

dorchester banner/susan m. bautz Tri-City Little League Girls’ Softball Team District 6 Champions and Maryland State Champions received a proclamation asking all citizens to pay “special tribute to both teams of exceptional athletes” at the Sept. 10 Hurlock council meeting.

dorchester banner/susan m. bautz
Tri-City Little League Girls’ Softball Team District 6 Champions and Maryland State Champions received a proclamation asking all citizens to pay “special tribute to both teams of exceptional athletes” at the Sept. 10 Hurlock council meeting.

HURLOCK — The seats were filled with special guests at the Sept. 10 Hurlock Town Council meeting. The room rang with the chatter of young people, eager to receive special recognition. Mayor Michael Henry struck the gavel — silence.

Sept. 10, 2018 was declared Tri-City Little League Girls Softball Team District 6 Champions and Maryland State Champions and Tri-City Little League Boys Baseball Team District 6 Champions Day in the Town of Hurlock. The proclamation asked all citizens to pay “special tribute to both teams of exceptional athletes.”
Mayor Henry congratulated the teams for being champions and “displaying good sportsmanship, unwavering spirit and dedication to the all-American sport of softball and baseball.”

The Mayor and Council distributed pins, awards, commendations, and proclamations in a convivial, well-organized event. Boys’ team manager Leo Bradley and girls’ team manager Chuck Creighton each received keys to the city. Boys’ coaches James Bramble and Jaime Fonseca and girls’ coaches Larry Nagel and Jeff Robinson received praise for donating their time, patience and talent to their respective teams. Parents were commended “for cheering on the teams, win or lose.”

The boys traveled to Hagerstown for the Maryland Little League Tournament and, said the Mayor, made “our community proud of their valiant attempt for the state championship.” Players include: John Boyle, Vernon Price, Brice Bradley, Blake Bramble, Thomas Leonard, Jaden Pearson, Rielly Ketterman, Luke Gadow, Louis Fonseca, Logan Dukes, Nathan Phippin, and Jimmy Creighton.

The girls competed for regional honors in Connecticut where they won the Maryland State Championship title. Players are: Emilee Cohee, Chayla Creighton, Bailie Dickinson, Alexis Hayward, Gracie Hoffman, Maggie Hubbard, Destiny Jackson, Cassidy Mowbray, Maddie Nagel, Brooke Outten, Emma Robinson, Kiley Tyson, and Averi Warfield.

After the ceremony the youngsters resumed their chatter and trooped out with proud friends and relatives. Later, Councilman Charles Cummings referred to the televised Little League games and said “Whoever thought north Dorchester would be on ESPN? Congratulations to the teams and the coaches who got them there.”

In his report Mr. Henry noted that the town has partnered with Dorchester County and the Chamber of Commerce to support Dorchester Goes Purple to bring awareness to opioid addiction. He said anyone with an addiction problem can contact the County Health Department. He emphasized that help is available to any family member in crisis, addicted or not. You don’t have to be addicted, you can also be a family member in crisis because of drug addiction. The town’s buildings and many homes are lit with purple lights in support.

Police Chief Les Hutton reported a shoplifting at Goose Creek and a warrant service during the previous two weeks and noted, “This was good.” Both Chief Hutton and volunteer fire company Chief Jason Trego reported on their respective organizations preparations for the anticipated hurricane.

Fortunately the county avoided the onslaught of the dangerous storm. The town and county were well-prepared in advance, however, if the storm had hit.
Town manager John Avery said the force main is half installed and he noted “I am very happy with the installation so far.” He said the new floor of one of the passenger train cars is being installed in preparation for the Fall Festival on Oct. 6.

During council member comments, Councilman Charles Cephas discussed economic development and emphasized keeping the “focus on bringing retail stores and industry and many things that our town is lacking now.” He wants to maintain and support the downtown area which, he says, “should be growing slowly and steadily.” He added the need for affordable housing and looking more closely at the storm water system to prepare for its updating.

The often discussed community center will serve the whole area, not just Hurlock explained Councilman Cephas. A meeting is planned for stakeholders to voice their opinions about a center. The councilman said, “This council is capable of doing what it has to do” to build a community center.

The Rev. Cephas moved that the town should tell the county that the town is not interested in buying the historic church building at 309 S. Main St. but it should go to an interested nonprofit or private individual. The motion passed unanimously.

On Sept. 22, 1-6 p.m. at the Hurlock train station, the Dorchester “Walk out of the Darkness” will be held to support the American Foundation for the Prevention of Suicide. The event includes not only a 3-5 mile walk but various events and vendors.

The Hurlock Fall Festival slated for Oct. 6 promises to be bigger and better than ever according to Councilman Earl Murphy.

Resident Jack Lewis asked if there is documentation of resolved code enforcement problems. Mr. Avery said he and code officer David George review issues twice a week orally but there is no written weekly report. Mr. Lewis said he thinks the “town’s a mess,” especially grass clippings in the streets.

Mr. Avery responded that 3 or 4 years ago there were few towns with grass clippings in the streets. “Now suddenly it’s become a problem. I’ve seen it in Preston and other towns. What it comes down to is a general non-caring from certain individuals or a lack of respect for other people. It gets to be very frustrating and difficult to deal with. Our code enforcement is very active. It all comes down to people who have no respect for other people in town and you can’t teach that. You have to deal with it. Just realize that these issues are not being overlooked.”

Susan Bautz is a freelance writer for the Dorchester Banner.

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