Hurlock searches for doctor to use Medical Center

HURLOCK — At the Sept. 25 Hurlock Town Council meeting Mayor Joyce Spratt announced as of Nov. 17 the town-owned Hurlock Medical Center will again be vacant. Since November 2013 the building has housed Nanticoke Family Health Services after the prior tenant, Choptank Community Health System (CCHS), left. For the past four years Hurlock residents have had access to five day a week health care delivered by nurse practitioner Dr. Jacqueline Smith, CRNP-FNP and her staff. The facility serves between 1,500-2,000 patients that use the medical facility annually. A Hurlock town history printed in 1992 states “In 1959, the Mayor and Council erected a Municipal Medical Center to provide increased medical services for the town.” In 1965, Dr. Carlos Barroso opened an office at the Hurlock Medical Center and served the local community until his retirement in 1993. Dr. Michael J. Fadden assumed the practice until a few years ago. He purchased the building in 1997 and practiced family medicine from the Hurlock center as a CCHS affiliate. When Nanticoke’s Hurlock location closes patients must locate another source for health care that may require travel for area residents who often walk, ride a bike, or even use a wheelchair to visit the center.  Efforts are underway to find a new tenant for the facility as quickly as possible. “It’s not easy to pick up and find another relationship with a doctor,” said Ms. Spratt.The Veterans’ Memorial Park is rapidly becoming a reality after many years of discussion and planning. The Park’s dedication is slated for Oct. 7 at noon during Hurlock’s 24th annual Fall Fest and 125th anniversary celebration. According to Town Administrator John Avery, “everything is coming together.”Mr. Avery said the fall cleanup program was successful. “We picked up all day Thursday, all day Friday, and had a number of dumpsters full on Saturday.” The pickup continued on Monday and Tuesday when all remaining items were removed. Police Chief Les Hutton reported a total of 1,002 calls for service in August. Incidents for the previous two weeks included: 1 assault with an arrest, 1 shed breaking and entering with a bike stolen, a juvenile arrest in an abandoned house, 2 shopliftings, a stolen and recovered vehicle, and 1 DUI. Town Attorney Robert Merriken read ordinance 2017-4 as introduced by councilman Jerry Rhue. It will add additional uses to commercial II zones to include rail terminals with associated warehouse facilities on a minimum of 5 acres; and, truck terminals with associated warehouse facilities also on a minimum of 5 acres. These ordinances will accommodate rail transportation for Koski Enterprises new warehouse facilities on Nealson Street.Councilman Russell Murphy said his friends from Houston asked that he “tell everybody in town that they really appreciate everybody donating things for them. They are coming in handy and they wanted him to say ‘thank you.’”Ms. Spratt added that Hurlock sent a total of 2 ½ truckloads of goods from the local area to hurricane ravaged areas in Houston. Cederick Turner announced a free Narcon class on Oct. 13 from 1-1:45 p.m. at the Full Gospel Church, 204 Academy Ave. Each attendee will receive one Narcon package. On Oct. 28, 2-4 p.m., Baywater Animal Rescue is raising money to help end the killing of pets in America’s shelters by participating in a fundraising event promoted by the national Best Friends Society. Pets and their parents can join the fun at the Hurlock Pavillion when a Wags and Wheels autocross starts the festivities and a Strut Your Mutt parade features Halloween costumed dogs. The event includes a canine carnival, games, and lots of laughs. Leslie Fraley spoke on behalf of the Hurlock Volunteer Fire Company (HVFC). On Oct. 28 the volunteers will sponsor an indoor/outdoor yard sale at the firehouse from 7 a.m.-noon. The sale is coupled with a trick or treat event on the parking lot that starts at 10am and concludes with costume judging at noon. The next meeting is slated for Oct. 10 because of Columbus Day observances on Monday, the regularly scheduled day.

Susan Bautz is a freelance writer for the Dorchester Banner.

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