Hurlock Council donates to child suffering from cancer

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Dorchester Banner/Susan M. Bautz
The Rev. Charles Cephas, Hurlock town councilman, holds 5-year-old Kaylie Jenniton as he asks residents to help the child with contributions to help her family during her battle with recently diagnosed cancer.

HURLOCK — It was a dramatic moment at the Oct. 26 Hurlock Town Meeting when Councilman Rev. Charles Cephas left the council table, walked into the audience and stopped in front of a young woman holding a sleepy child. As he took the little one from her mother’s arms he explained, “This beautiful baby has cancer. I asked her mother to come so you could see her and I’m asking if there’s any way anyone here can help her as she goes to Baltimore for chemo treatments.”

Rev. Cephas and the Full Gospel Church of which he is pastor are sponsoring and organizing fundraising efforts and prayer lists for 5-year-old Kaylie Jeanniton and her mother Cinerra Baine as they begin the long, difficult process of treatment.

At the recent meeting the council contributed $500 to the fundraising effort and Mayor Joyce Spratt said that donations will be accepted at the town office. In addition, Councilman Earl Murphy said a donation jar will be available at his family’s Halloween event, Marshmallows with the Murphys on Saturday, from 6-8.
Last year the town sponsored fundraisers for another young Hurlock child suffering from cancer – Emma Ross, dubbed “Hurlock’s Little Princess.” Residents rallied at various well attended events held to alleviate the family’s financial concerns and offer spiritual support.

At the Oct. 26 Hurlock Town Meeting Dr. Carl Barham presented a Photo Montage celebrating the Historical Freedom Shrine on East New Market-Hurlock Road outside of Hurlock. Dr. Barham noted he researched the shrine for 3 ½ years and became very familiar with and had “good feelings for north Dorchester County” as 10 men of different races came together to change the political climate in Maryland. The change in 1985 from at-large to district voting was immortalized in the 20 ton monument dedicated to the men who brought voter reform to Maryland. From that time on a politician running for office in a district must live in that district.

The Historical Freedom Shrine is located on private property at 7014 East New Market-Elwood Road. The inscription on the monument reads: “We the people honor these men who brought democracy to Dorchester County July 8, 1985 by a change of the Constitution of Maryland ordered by the United States Courts.”
Dr. Barham noted that the photo-montage and historical freedom shrine are displayed in the County Council Chamber, Cambridge Public Library, Hurlock Branch Library and Hurlock United Methodist Church.

The men that made this happen were members of the North Dorchester Democratic Club:

• George C. Jones: Leader of the North Dorchester Democratic Club (NDDC), accountant and businessman residing in Hurlock;
• Richard Harding: Hurlock accountant and businessman;
• Edward Conway: community organizer, businessman who lived in Hurlock;
• Leon Medford: Hurlock businessman, accountant;
• Charles F. Hurley Sr.: educator, High School Supervisor and School Board member from East New Market;
• William Reid: businessman and truck driver from East New Market;
• William Corkran: School Board member, businessman, accountant and farmer, from Hurlock;
• Gregory Meekins: former NAACP President who lives in Cambridge;
• Don W. Bradley: former mayor of Hurlock, real estate broker and businessman;
• Oliver Harding: former mayor of Hurlock, businessman and farmer.

On Nov. 3, from 2-4 pm, a reception is slated at the Hurlock Train Station to recognize North Dorchester County as the birthplace of voter reform in Maryland. State and local officials are expected to attend as well as any interested member of the public.

Susan Bautz is a freelance writer for the Dorchester Banner.

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