ENM Scout announces service plan to add benches to walking trail

Dorchester Banner/Susan M. Bautz Boy Scout Al Flaggs presented his service project for town commissioners that is designed to meet the requirement that such projects must benefit not-for-profit organizations excluding the Boy Scouts of America. Mr. Flaggs described two benches planned for use by visitors to the East New Market Friendship Park’s walking trail. He will also participate in beautifying the town’s Trading Post heritage museum.

Dorchester Banner/Susan M. Bautz
Boy Scout Al Flaggs presented his service project for town commissioners that is designed to meet the requirement that such projects must benefit not-for-profit organizations excluding the Boy Scouts of America. Mr. Flaggs described two benches planned for use by visitors to the East New Market Friendship Park’s walking trail. He will also participate in beautifying the town’s Trading Post heritage museum.


EAST NEW MARKET — Reaching the Eagle Scout level of Boy Scouts of America is a major accomplishment. North Dorchester scout Al Flaggs is beginning his journey to join the ranks of Eagle Scouts. To achieve the Eagle designation is no easy task. Requirements include: Achieving Life Scout level and serving for 6 months in one or more positions of responsibility; completing 21 merit badges; planning and completing a service project that benefits an organization other than Scouts; and, successfully passing a “board of review.”

At the East New Market July 12 commission meeting he asked town officials to support his service project to help the town. The young man described his plan to design and build two 6’ benches for placement along the new Friendship Park Walking Trail. Mayor Caroline Cline explained that if commissioners approve, the town will provide the cost of materials out of the Community Contributions budget. Mr. Flaggs noted that each bench should cost about $100. He added that a scout leader suggested including a picnic bench as well but commissioners explained there is already a bench in Friendship Park adjacent to the trail.

Ms. Cline suggested planting indigenous, native plants and asked the commission to consider beautifying the area around the Trading Post which will soon function as a town museum. The commission agreed. Vice Mayor David Tolley moved to raise the maximum cost for the benches to $300. His motion was unanimously approved. Following Mr. Flagg’s presentation, Mayor Cline noted the “East New Market Town Council approves of your plan and are appreciative of your effort.” The group unanimously offered to prepare a letter for him if necessary to take to the panel of judges who must approve his project.

Mayor Cline read a letter from the State Highway Commission (SHA) regarding promised funding for renovation of the railroad station acquired by the town 9 years ago. As of July 8 SHA advised the Maryland Historical Trust with whom they are cooperating in the project, that “we are willing to enter into an agreement with the town regarding the needed repairs for the East New Market railroad depot in the amount of $50,000. I know that you all have received the agreement and it is under review.” Ms. Cline was pleased that after 9 years the promised grant will be provided.

Code Inspector Nancy Jackson reported several notices of violation which, with follow up by Ms. Jackson, have been abated. Re-inspections and follow-up are scheduled to prepare for abatement of the remainder.

The Friendship Park walking trail is almost finished and will be ready for use shortly. The official ribbon cutting is slated for Sept. 10, 10 am when the weather will be cooler.

Commissioner John Holliday reported a problem with residents on his street feeding feral and stray cats which are continuing to cause a “public nuisance.” He said, “I pick up plates every day that they have been fed on.” Commissioner Tolley suggested a registered/certified letter could be sent asking these residents to stop feeding the cats or legal action will be taken. The commission agreed.

Resident Chuck Hurley discussed a water main problem he had last month for which he does not believe he is responsible. He noted that at the time he discovered a hole in the main line he was unable to reach town officials and called a plumber to fix the leak. A plumbing bill over $500 plus a water bill of over $300 brought the total he was billed to nearly $900. The plumbers said the hole resulted from stones under the sidewalk coming through his main. He noted he is not “blaming anyone,” and suggested that the problem is a “town problem” and suggested the commissioners should review the town’s policy of responsibility in such issues. The commission agreed to review possible solutions for Mr. Hurley and asked he “Give us enough time to review the problem.”

On July 16 at 10 am in the Municipal Building a second homeowners workshop, “Lawn and Garden,” will discuss the Maryland state fertilizer use law, composting, native plants, and how to use the soil test kit gifted to participants. The free sessions, held in the Municipal Building, are capped at 20 families for a total of about 30 participants.

Susan Bautz is a freelance writer for the Dorchester Banner.

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