State Farm’s Holotik is motivated to help people

CAMBRIDGE – Some people are just cut out to work with people. Like Megan Holotik, owner of the State Farm Agency in Cambridge Marketplace. “I just like helping people,” she says, “and that’s what motivates me. Helping people and helping them understand what insurance is and how it benefits them. Yes, it’s a necessary evil. You have to have car insurance; you have to have home insurance, things like that.”

This petite blond woman just celebrated her 16th anniversary as an agent. She is not the stereotypical insurance agent. She was a college student in 1987 and a teacher told her a State Farm agent was recruiting for a new agency in Salisbury. “I was 20 years old,” she explains. “and I interviewed for the job. I sent him a handwritten ‘thank you’ for taking the time to interview me and that’s what sealed the deal for the job. The rest is history. I was a team member for 15 years.”

Megan grew up in Caroline County. She married a local man, had her son Hunter, and the couple purchased a farm in Linkwood. With no openings at a local insurance agency, she continued to commute to Salisbury. When the agent decided to return to Philadelphia because Cambridge was not big or busy enough for him, she applied and in on Dec. 1, 2001, she was accepted. “I went right from being a team member to being an agent.”

Today Cambridge is big enough for two State Farm agencies – Megan’s and Karen Davis’.

“I appreciate the community support,” Megan notes. “I’ve been president of the Chamber of Commerce; president of Rotary; and I’m still pretty active in those clubs.” She loves the area and being part of the community. But most of all she loves helping people. “That’s the message I would want to get across to people – that if they ever need help I’m here to help.”

Megan likes to explain what insurance is and why people need it. “I enjoy it when I’m talking with someone and you can just see the light going on, ‘oh, I get it.’”

“For instance, when you have life insurance and something happens to you I’m going to be there for your family. I’ll be able to take the burden off their shoulders.” She prefers people contact part of her business to the numbers part. “I think I’m a more concept type of person. You know, ‘this is the concept behind it and this is how we help you.’”

Megan’s work ethic has passed to her son, 22-year-old Hunter Nabb, who has worked since he was 12 years old on the farm. “I’m very, very proud of him,” she smiles, “he’s a hardworking young man. His father and I instilled that in him when he was young.”

Megan’s face is familiar to the thousands of US Rt. 50 travelers when they pass the large billboard that prominently and frequently advertises the two Cambridge State Farm agencies. Does it bring new prospects? Well, she is not really sure. “I should ask ‘where did you hear about me?’ I do get a lot of comments on it. And, it keeps my name in front of people.” That is important as are the mailings she does because, according to Megan, “There are certain reasons why people shop insurance.”

They may buy a new car, or make a purchase, or have a claim and are unhappy with their service; or their rates go up. “So if something happens like that and they remember my name they think, ‘oh, I’ve been meaning to talk to Megan,’ and they remember and come into the office.”

It must work because business is good. Megan expects to add to the two sales people in the office, one remote worker, and a high school student who works part-time.

And what does she think about the changes to the shopping center? “We’re very excited about the changes,” she says. It looks so much better and the entrance will be phenomenal. It’s nice to see someone come to Cambridge and have a vision of what the town can actually be.”
This businesswoman takes great pride in the fact that while she works in Cambridge, she also lives in Cambridge. “It’s my community and I appreciate the fact that I can serve the community I live in.”

Susan Bautz is a freelance writer for the Dorchester Banner.

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